Wednesday, July 5, 2017

IWSG Wednesday


The first Wednesday of every month is officially Insecure Writer’s Support Group day. Members post about their doubts and fears, discuss struggles and triumphs, and offer words of encouragement to others who are struggling.

Optional July 5th Question: What is one valuable lesson you've learned since you started writing?  Wow.  This is a great question isn't it? There's such a wide range of topics to choose from: critique groups, beta readers, advertising, the writing process, agents, etc.
 I'm going to  focus  on publication options. Trad. Small press. Indy. Hybrid.  I'm currently a hybrid. I have published both sides of the fence. I have publishers and am publishing as an Indie.  There are pros and cons to both.  With a publisher you get a cover artist and an editor and some advertising. There are a lot of wonderful publishing companies out there. Our own Diane Wolfe's Dancing Lemurs being one of the best and one I wouldn't hesitate to recommend. On the negative side: if you want your rights back, some publishers make it difficult. If they are struggling financially they don't always pay your royalties. 
With Indie:  You're responsible for everything: writing, editing, cover art, publishing, and marketing. 
After having been on both sides of the fence, my personal lesson learned is I prefer Indie. I can invest as little or as much time as I want on all of the above. I can also invest a lot or a little financially on advertising, editing and cover art. And while my books are up against millions of others, my attention is focused on mine, where as a publisher must focus on all his/her ducklings.  And sometimes, depending on the size of the publisher, those ducklings run in the hundreds. 
Indy versus a publisher is just a matter of choice.  What works for me may not work for someone else and what works for them may not work for me.
What about you? What's your preference?
As for personal news. I have my rights back  and have re-released Silverhills. If you can help me get the word out via blog, FB or Twitter, just give me a shout out.




 In the 1870s Brandon Wade is driving a herd of longhorns over the Chisholm Trail when a youth appears out of nowhere riding a magnificent black stallion and packing a deadly looking six-gun. In need of trail hands, Brandon hires the young man. Not until weeks later, during the middle of a terrible stampede, does Brandon learn that his young sharpshooter is a beautiful woman. A woman full of fire and passion who he burns to possess. A woman steeped in mystery who refuses to disclose her past.

Alexandria O'Malley is on the run and must be able to disappear at a moment's notice. When she hires on to the cattle drive, she doesn't expect the powerful attraction between herself and her trail boss or the response of her treacherous body.



38 comments:

  1. Thanks for the explanation about Indie/publishers. Good to keep things in your own hands. Must look for Silverhills, though, haven't read that one yet! Hugs, Valerie

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    1. You always put a smile on my face, Val.
      Hugs back,

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  2. Most interesting Sandra, Thanks for sharing this with us.

    Yvonne.

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    1. My pleasure, Yvonne.
      Enjoy your day.

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  3. Although I doubt I will ever publish a book, it seems to me that if you want to make a name for yourself, but don't have one, publish one yourself to begin. I've read that so many novels get rejected, most publishers want to represent only big name authors. I like how you explained the ins and outs of this business.

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    1. It is really difficult to get published with trad. And back before self pub and small press it was the only game in town, which meant fewer authors. There's thousands of us now:)

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  4. As a bookaholic I found this fascinating. Congratulations on releasing/re-releasing yet another book. I hope it goes really, really well.

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    1. Thanks, EC:) Glad you enjoyed. And going really, really well, really works for me:)

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  5. Congratulations on getting your rights back.
    It helps we have options. I didn't have a clue in the beginning. Going indie would've been very bad for me. I'm grateful Dancing Lemur gave me a shot and that it's worked out so well.

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    1. Dancing Lemur was a perfect fit for Cassa, Alex. You have done so well. Kudos to both you and Diane.

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  6. Having never been traditionally published, I have no point of comparison, but I like the control I have with indie publishing.

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  7. I always hear it broken into three categories: traditional, small presses, self-publishing. With traditional vs. small press, you get some differences. Traditional has more pull with getting widespread distribution for your books (and getting them into libraries, schools, bookfairs, etc.), but small presses are more likely to keep publishing you on a steady basis and pay you more in royalties but little to no advances. But they handle the cover and editing, usually, so that's a bonus!

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    1. Both have pluses don't they, Steph?

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  8. I learned through doing, the indie way is all I've gone as I don't like to wait around for a year for release.

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    1. Release time is a factor too, for sure, Pat.

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  9. Thank you, Sandra.

    I've found being both the publisher and an author the best of it all. Even if it does add a ton of pressure sometimes.

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    1. Kudos, Diane. I don't think I could keep up with both.

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  10. I still don't know about self-publishing, but seem to think I probably own't do so.

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    1. I understand. In the beginning I thought the same thing.

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  11. Thanks for your viewpoints on traditional vs. indie publishing. I would love to try traditional publishing just to have access to a professional editor. If that chance doesn't come, I'll just have to hire one I suppose.

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  12. There's certainly benefits, including your books sitting on the shelves:)

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  13. We all have to find our way, and aren't lucky to have so many choices these days? Congrats on your success as an Indie, Sandra.

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    1. That's for sure.
      Thanks, Lee. I'm still swimming upstream, but I'm swimming;)

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  14. Yay for getting your rights back! When I meet a writer who is looking at publishing for the first time, I always have to have the talk. It really boils down to what you want and expect out of the publishing experience, but thankfully we live in a world where you can go both ways, eh?

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  15. Tough to get all done. I like the character with a treacherous body, a nice mystic when meeting her.LOL

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  16. I would have thought having a publisher would be better but never thought of one's rights being taken so I don't like that at all. I wonder what some of the famous think like Rowling and King? Great insight.

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    1. I seriously doubt that they have the same issues, if any, the 'regulars' do:)

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  17. Hi Sandra - focus ... is an essential isn't it. So glad you got your rights back - all the best with the re-release of Silverhills - cheers Hilary

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  18. Oh, yes! Focus. That's my problem, I think -- too many passions. But the best thing I've learned since writing is that editing almost always makes it better. Sometimes too much detail is just too much. I don't force myself to write to word count since I stopped working and writing for the magazine we did at the station (and press stuff) but I'm always aware of how writing always is a little better when it's trimmed up!

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    1. Completely agree. And having many passions is a wonderful thing;)

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  19. You know I'm not a writer Sandra, but I find this very interesting!! It's like going into an art gallery. Some good, some not. Congrats on getting your rights back! Wishing you much success with your book! Big Hugs!

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