Tuesday, January 9, 2018

Flaming Crimes

AUTHOR NOTE: Many scenes in Flaming Crimes (Disaster Crimes #4) came from real life. For this short blog tour, I am sharing my memories as a ten-part continuous story, so hop along for the entire experience.


Series: Disaster Crimes #4
Page Count: 304 
Digital Price: 4.99 
Print Price: 16.99
Rating: Spicy (PG13) 
BUY LINKS:
FLAMING GUEST POST PART TWO:
I begged my best friend’s dad to “Go, go, go.”When they dropped me off at my driveway, they sped off to make their house several blocked away was okay. And there I stood, yards from a burning beast. It was loud. Cracking. Groaning. It was hot. Burning. Scorching. It was bright. Flaring. Searing.

I dropped my backpack on the ground and ran inside my house. I remember grabbing my pillow and blanket. I might’ve put clothes into a garbage bag, but I just don’t remember. That moment of sheer terror is a blur now.

 But I do remember what happened after. I shoved my blanket into the trunk of the car and was bawling my eyes out on the driveway. The fire was so close that I was rooted to the spot, afraid to go back inside because I thought that if I did, the house would start to burn. I was in such a state that my mom ordered my brother to drive me and the dog down to the end of the road.

I tried to stay in the car, but I couldn’t. I was too terrified to not watch the fire, so I climbed out of the car. That’s when I saw a crowd of gawkers, neighbors from just a street or two over, standing together at the end of the road, watching my family fight to get our cats out and safe our home.

Overcome, I shouted at them, “Don’t just stand there!” I wanted their help.

And then the firetrucks came.

 TO BE CONTINUED….

 FLAMING CRIMES EXCERPT:

While driving her car to the end of the street, with the flames flashing at her in the rearview mirror, she imagined the fire sweeping across the city, following them down the highway. Nowhere they’d go would be safe. It’d be right behind them, frying everything to a crisp wherever they went, until the world was an inferno.

 She got out of her car to hear sirens shaking the air. The urgent horn of fire trucks wailed as they tried to get to them. She turned toward the end of the road and saw a crowd of onlookers staring at the fire knocking at her door, staring at her. Anger flared inside her. How could they gawk and not help? How dare they watch as she loses the home she wanted to build a family in? How dare they?

 “What is the matter with you?” she yelled at them, with her throat tight and raw. She wanted to tell them to help or go home, but right at that moment, the fire trucks came.



 The story will continue on these blogs:
1/8Circle of Friends Books - Part 1
1/9Sandra CoxPart 2
1/10Elements of EmaginettePart 3
1/11Julie FlandersPart 4
1/12I Think; Therefore, I YamPart 5
1/15Alex J. CavanaughPart 6
1/16Just JemiPart 7
1/17Sandra DaileyPart 8
1/18FundinmentalPart 9
1/19Elizabeth SeckmanPart 10



About the Author: Chrys Fey is the author of the Disaster Crimes Series, a unique concept blending romance, crimes, and disasters. She’s partnered with the Insecure Writer’s Support Group and runs their Goodreads book club. She’s also an editor for Dancing Lemur Press.

Author Links:
Thank you for reading this post! Don’t forget to hop along to the other posts on their designated days for the full fiery story.

 SHARE: Your fire story with me.


56 comments:

  1. Wow. I could feel the heat in that excerpt.
    In 2003 (on my birthday) a firestorm tore through our city. Over 500 homes were destroyed. 4 people and innumerable birds and animals lost their lives. At 3 in the afternoon the sky was so dark that lights were needed. Except that power was out. I still remember the fire ringing the hills around, the roar of the wind, and the scent of burning eucalpytus.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh my goodness. That firestorm was awful. For cam do unspeakable damage.

      Thanks for commenting!

      Delete
  2. This sounds very good! Have a great day, hugs, Valerie

    ReplyDelete
  3. This is a very good post of an excellent writer, seems like an excellent book.
    Enjoy your day.

    Yvonne.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Getting the cats out can be tricky as they tend to run, caught Cassie though before a burning my apartment did go.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I fear having to try to get my four cats out of my house if a fire ever threatened my home. They are scared of everything that I know they’d be hiding.

      Delete
    2. That's one of my big fears...how I'd get all the critters out.

      Delete
  5. Wow! To think that some of these stories are based on real life is so sad. The writer does a really good job of describing how people react when they see a disaster such as this. Hope your Tuesday is amazing Super Sandra! hugs...RO

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for commenting, RO! Yes, I’ve used my experiences in Hurricane Crimes and Flaming Crimes. There’s even one scene from Tsunami Crimes that’s real.

      Delete
    2. She certainly does.
      Hope yours is too, Rockin Ro;)

      Delete
  6. no conocia esta novela, que interesante, estará en español? para españa. gracias

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Chrys, the question is will this be in Spanish.

      Delete
    2. Ah. Thank you for the translation, Sandra!

      Sibaritismos de Inma, unfortunately it will not be in Spanish. I'm sorry!

      Delete
  7. Just standing and watching when they could be helping. At the very least, they should've been busy with their own house.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That’s what made me mad. I use this in my book and gave Donovan a smart explanation to share with Beth for why they stand and watch...it’s like driving past a car accident...you can’t help but look. Everyone reacts differently.

      Delete
    2. What a horrible situation to be in.

      Delete
  8. That you had to go through this is harrowing. I will follow and go back to yesterday to read what you went through Chrys. I am not surprised by people because this is a typical reaction. I hope the pussy cats are ok.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you for following along, Birgit! I share more about the cats to come.

      Delete
    2. Good for you for going back and catching the first installment, Birgit.

      Delete
  9. The parallels in your story and the real-life events is a mark of a good writer; in both cases the emotions are so genuine. I can't imagine standing around watching someone’s house burn. I can't tolerate rubberneckers in traffic. I always look straight ahead, say a quick prayer, and keep moving. If I can’t help, I'm certainly not going to gawk.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Toi! I always believe in using real life. I never knew why I had to go through that horrible day, but maybe it was to write this story, and to write it with truth.

      Delete
    2. Toi, Thanks for coming by to support Chrys.

      Delete
  10. she placed us well into the situation

    ReplyDelete
  11. Thank you so much for having me on your blog today, Sandra! I’m glad you are my second tour stop. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Entirely my pleasure, Chrys. I'm glad I was your second tour stop too:)

      Delete
  12. Sounds horrific! I get angry with rubber neckers, so I can feel it in the story.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh yes. To some degree, it's natural, but if you just watch people suffering or going through a trauma and don't help or at least look away, there's something wrong.

      Delete
    2. It does sound horrific, Sharon. Very scary.

      Delete
  13. Hi Sandra and Chrys ... fire is terrifying ... but I definitely wouldn't be standing there gawping. I hope the cats were ok - but also just hope life in general is safe. Recently there've been too many fires. Great excerpt ... cheers Hilary

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I will be talking more about the cats in posts to come.

      The fires that are burning now are awful. I feel so much for the people impacted by any sort of fire. Now or in the past.

      Delete
    2. Hi Hillary,
      I agree, fire is terrifying. It seems like California is constantly battling them.

      Delete
  14. It's hard to image what it would be like to stand there and watch your life burn. I've tried on occasion, and I just can't get there.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is hard to imagine unless you're in that situation.

      Delete
  15. I probably would've been a basket case, too.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We never know how we'll react in a situation like this. Unfortunately, I tend to panic.

      Delete
    2. I do too, Chrys. I don't do well in emergencies.

      Delete
  16. I can understand being so shocked by the event that I would be frozen to the spot. Maybe the fire's heat would thaw me out and into action. Frightening. Great excerpt!
    JQ Rose

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dito, Janet. Great excerpt! Very frightening.

      Delete
    2. And there was certainly a lot of heat. lol Thanks for commenting, Janet!

      Delete
  17. thanks for sharing! Scary -- but fascinating.

    ReplyDelete
  18. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  19. A loud hot bright fire so close to home would be scary. Your story conveys so much.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you! I tried to make these posts as engaging as my book. I'm glad you think I did a good job. :)

      Delete
  20. So scary!! I was involved with one house fire and I was the only person at home! Lucky I was, because I saved our house! The only thing I was upset about was our cat! Lucky the fireman rescued him out of the closet!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank goodness you were there. And thank goodness for that firefighter!

      Delete
  21. It would have made me angry to have people gawking at the situation rather than doing something!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Exactly. If I saw that, I'd offer my help to the family.

      Delete